This Modern Glitch – Preview

The Wombats new album is almost here. I take a look at the album preview that has been released, and tell you whether it’s worth your hard-earned cash. Read on for a complete coverage of the entire track list.

The album art, typically making as much sense as some of the lyrics.

Our Perfect Disease              

The ‘modern’ focus to this album is thrown at you straight from the off, with a quirky electronic backdrop, but the same vocals that maybe the band so unique. Heavy beats and catchy lyrics that re-establish why The Wombats did so well with their first album.

Tokyo (Vampires and Wolves)

Their first single from the new album released early this year, so we all know about it. It was our first taste of what they’d been working on, and an incredibly meaty single, with many layers to divulge. The great drumming and bass can be most noted here.

Jump Into The Fog

The much slower second release from their new album was available as a free download from their website for a limited time. I loved it then and I love it now; it’s a song that progresses, changing each time you hear it and attaching new meaning again and again.

Anti-D

A slower but more atmospheric take on some of their previous songs, with an undercurrent  of foot-tapping melody built all the way up to the chorus. The backstory revolving around anti-depressants is intriguing, but quickly lost in the overdriven bass guitar.

Last Night I Dreamt

Think if Everything Everything were given a drums and melodic background music, as opposed to the atmospheric type they normally use, and that’s this song. The electronic focus returns but managing to keep the typical melodic underscore that The Wombats are so infamous for.

Techno Fan

A synth melody is overtaken by bass to set up the first verse with ridiculous lyrics. You can feel the great chorus building before it even gets to it. A bit less impacting than the others have been, until you get to just after a minute in, and it feels all ‘Wombatty’ again.

1996

Slow again, but sounds most truest to it’s lyrics so far. Again the undercurrent of electric music is a bit more prominent than the guitars they focused upon in the first album.

Walking Disasters

The bassy introduction gets your foot going again (mine is tapping away now listening to it), with a much more abstract chorus and choice of backing track sounds. Catchy and intriguing, but not one to be remembered.

Girls/Fast Cars

Although sounding like it’s been recorded on a spaceship, it manages to be infectious with the drumming and purely just enjoying the build up to the chorus. It’s Dr. Suzanne Matox PhD (from ‘A Guide to Love, Loss and Desperation) all modernised and tranced up.

Schumacher/The Champagne

Another synth note to finish, but a good one to finish on. It’s a slow infectious beat, but manages to hold your interest (at least for the first few times you hear it) but doesn’t quite sum up the album. However it does taste of what this album has ventured into.

Having spent some time with the album preview from The Wombats, I’m left in no doubt that they’ll be able to break the ‘failed second album’ mould. They follow up the huge success of their debut album with ‘This Modern Glitch’, which is due for release April 25th.

Want to suggest a review for me? Let me know on Twitter or by email.

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